Search Results: Siebold hemlock

By Jim Gorman
No white nor red was ever seenSo am'rous as this lovely green-Andrew Morrell As leitmotif to last time’s “who does your garden grow,” we turn next to Siebold Hemlock, Tsuga sieboldii. The genus Tsuga is small with just nine to eleven species, depending on taxonomic analysis, compared with the much larger genus Pinus, or pines. All hemlocks are medium-sized to large, evergreen trees, native to North America and Asia. Previously we have reviewed Canadian hemlock, by far the most prevalent species growing at Mount Auburn. Siebold Hemlock, Tsuga sieboldii, also referred to as Southern Japanese hemlock may reach heights of 100-feet in the wild, but more often half that tall in landscape use. They have single, flattened, needle-like leaves, each about ½-inch-long, with smooth edges and a tiny notch on the tip. The undersides have two white stomatal bands. The seed cones when ripe are pale brown, one-inch-long. Read More
January 29, 2019
Tagged: Winter Horticulture Highlight 
By Jim Gorman
…And because the breath of flowers is far sweeter in the air (where it comes and goes like the warbling of music) than in the hand, therefore nothing is more fit for that delight than to know what be the flowers and plants that do best perfume the air.             Francis Bacon Springtime’s woody floral perfumes have thus far included winter hazel, Oregon grape, magnolia, fothergilla, cherry, crabapple, lilac and wisteria among others. Yet to sweetly scent our air will be fringe tree, yellow wood, linden, Virginia sweetspire, butterfly bush as well as much later the franklin tree. Read More
June 4, 2021
Tagged: Uncategorized 
By Jim Gorman
Plants with winter seasonal interest include evergreens of pine, spruce, holly, yew, sequoia, fir, along with diverse others. Another one is Persian parrotia, Parrotia persica. Read More
January 5, 2021
Tagged: Uncategorized 

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