Plants


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January

There is no better time to come and enjoy our impressive evergreens. Mount Auburn’s conifer collection is noted for its size and diversity. With more than 80 different taxa and more than 1,500 plants, it is comparable to the conifer collections at … Continue reading

February

Now is a great time for a second look at many of our deciduous trees and shrubs. Even without their more showy foliage and flowers, many of our plants have something to contribute to the winter landscape. From the the impressive size and shape of some trees … Continue reading

March

Early signs of spring appear throughout the landscape in March.  The cheerful yellow blossoms of witchhazel that appear early in the month and the beautiful carpets of scilla  that emerge by month’s end remind us that warmer days are soon on their way. … Continue reading

April

Mount Auburn is painted in shades of yellow, pink, white and lilac thanks to the daffodils, forsythia, magnolias, and redbuds now blooming.  For many, though, it is the April flowering of Mount Auburn’s 20+ varieites of ornamental cherries that truly signal spring’s arrival. … Continue reading

May

It is no wonder that Mount Auburn welcomes so many visitors each May.  Flowering dogwoods, crabapples, lilacs, and azaleas are just some of what is on display.  If you’ve never been to the Cemetery, now is the time to make … Continue reading

June

Though May might be the peak of spring bloom, there is still plenty of interest in June.  Rhododendrons, Mountain Laurel, and Kousa Dogwoods add plenty of late-spring color to the landscape. The annual and perennial plants planted in flower beds throughout … Continue reading

July

In July, make your way out to Willow Pond for a glimpse of our butterfly garden at its peak. As you walk at to the pond, you’ll notice a number of summer-blooming trees and shrubs adding seasonal interest to the … Continue reading

August

Late summer blooming ornamentals provide plenty of reasons to visit Mount Auburn, though perhaps the best reason to visit the Cemetery in August is to seek shade beheath the Cemetery’s dense canopy of shade trees.  Maples and oaks are among our shade … Continue reading

September

As the last of our summer-blooming plants make a showing in September, other plants begin showing the tell-tale signs of autumn’s approach.  Our wildflower meadow, located at  Washington Tower, is now at its peak as we bid farewell to one … Continue reading

October

By mid-October Mount Auburn’s landscape is awash in color.  As our many deciduous trees and shrubs begin to transform their foliage into jewel-tone shades of red, orange, yellow, and purple, other plants set out their fall fruits and nuts. Here are some … Continue reading

November

The diversity in Mount Auburn’s collection of trees ensures an prolonged foliage season each fall.  Even in November, there is still plenty of color in the landscape. From our noble oaks displaying autumn color to the fall-blooming witchhzel, there is plenty to see at the Cemetery.  Here are … Continue reading

December

As our deciduous plants drop their last leaves we welcome the winter season. Now is the time to explore Mount Auburn’s many plants displaying four season interest.  The diversity in our horticultural collections ensure that a visit to Mount Auburn at … Continue reading

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What’s in Bloom 2022

May 16, 2022

What’s in Bloom: Week of May 23, 2022

Flowering dogwood, Cornus florida ‘Aurora’, Almy Road

Deutzia, Deutzia gracillis, many locations

Leucothoe, Leucothoe sp., many locations

Bridal wreath, Spiraea xvanhouttei, several locations

Tropical hibiscus, Hibiscus sp., Fountain Ave.

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Hobblebush

May 3, 2022

We tramped for miles on a wooded walk

Where dog-hobble grew on its twisted stalk

            -Dana Gioia

Recently, while entering the higher end of Sumac Path heading down towards Consecration Dell there were several plants of Hobblebush, Viburnum lantanoides,just opening their spring flowers. These visually distinct blossoms are arranged in 4 to 6-inch-wide, circular, composite, corymbs (flat-topped flowers). Rendered showy by an outer ring of white flowers, each 1-1 ½-inch, with 5-parted bracts, these all are sterile. Their center is composed of numerous small, true reproductive flowers, of an off-white shade.

green leaves of hobblebush with flowers
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Horticulture Highlight: Willow, Salix sp.

April 5, 2022

Horticulture Highlight: Willow, Salix sp.

Willow weep for me, willow weep for me

Bend your branches green along the stream that runs to sea

            -Ann Ronell

Composer/songwriter Ann Ronell (1905-1993) recounted that her 1932 popular hit song (covered by scores of recording artists since then) was originally inspired while at Radcliffe, by beautiful willows on/near campus. Before and since then, innumerable people (and wildlife) have likewise been enthralled with countless willows.

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Bristlecone Pine, Pinus aristata

February 27, 2022

Up in the mountains that edge the Great Basin

it was whispered to me

by the oldest of trees. 

By the Oldest of Beings

the Oldest of Trees

Bristlecone Pine….

               – Gary Snyder

Many visitors to Mount Auburn, come not only to be in the here and now, but also to be conveyed to another place, perhaps across time, that includes significant, even spiritual, memories.  Thoughts of loved ones often predominate, but for some, memories also may include flora, or fauna. Recently while stopping here at a Bristlecone Pine, Pinus aristata, I was vicariously, transported to yesteryear, across the United States.

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