Virtual ways to enjoy the Cemetery

May 1, 2020

Follow Us on Social Media

Our staff continue to regularly post historical and horticultural highlights on our social medial channels. Make sure you are following us to learn more about the may facets of Mount Auburn and to get our latest news: Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.


Join a Virtual Public Program

UPCOMING

Check the calendar to register for an upcoming virtual program!


Watch Recordings of previously held Virtual Programs:

These programs have already happened, however you can watch the recorded videos here at a time of your own choosing!


Explore our Archives

Explore our Online Collections Database. This online catalog allows you to explore Mount Auburn’s Historical Collections & Archives. Holdings include a wide range of prints, photographs, books, ephemera, maps, plans, decorative arts, fine art, and more than 3,500 linear feet of archival records.


An Invitation to Help Transcribe Our History – From Home! Mount Auburn is pleased to announce an exciting new transcription project that welcomes your participation in making our history more accessible. The Cemetery’s Historical Collections & Archives staff have preserved our most significant archival documents, but many of these are hand-written 19th-century letters and reports that are not easy to read. By transcribing these materials, researchers will be able to read and search across thousands of pages for the first time. That’s where you come in!


Learn more about Mount Auburn’s Significant Monuments in our online exhibit featuring thirty monuments of historic and artistic significance.


Our digital archive includes all of the past issues of Sweet Auburn: The Magazine of the Friends of Mount Auburn.


Be Inspired

Explore the final projects of Mount Auburn’s former Artists-in-Residence:

earth.sky – In a multimedia project that includes twenty nine videos, photographs, and words, Mount Auburn’s first Artist-in-Residence Roberto Mighty celebrates the seasons and the stories of Mount Auburn.


Spring & Autumn Suites – Twelve classical works composed by Mount Auburn’s second Artist-in-Residence Mary Bichner and recorded at WGBH Studios draw inspiration from the landscape’s seasonal colors and the poetry of its notable residents


Learn more about our many facets

Stay Home Sweet Auburn: an exciting new video series started by The Friends of Mount Auburn during the pandemic. We are continuing to expand our virtual programming so you can learn from home!


Listen to the recent Talk Nerdy Podcast interview with Paul Kwaitkowski, Mount Auburn’s Wildlife Conservation and Sustainability Manager on Citizen Science to learn more about our efforts to create beneficial wildlife habitat.


Browse Mount Auburn’s website and read Notable People Biographies and History, Horticulture, and Wildlife Highlights, or learn about Environmental Stewardship initiatives.


Take a Deep Breath

View a peaceful and calming Autumn at Mount Auburn slideshow with music from Composer-in-Residence Mary Bichner.


Watch a serene scene slideshow from Mount Auburn with inspiring music!


Relax with a Mount Auburn Moment of Zen. Mount Auburn’s grounds may be closed to the public to keep our staff and families burying loved ones safe, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy a bit of springtime at Mount Auburn.


Watch a contemplative concert with Satigata, performed in Story Chapel on April 9, 2017 and recorded by Cambridge Community Television.


Enjoy memories of previous fall seasons at Mount Auburn Cemetery!

Photos below are from this spring and summer!

5 Comments

  1. Eliza Richardson says:

    What is the yellow, precocious-flowering tree with hanging short strings of bells, which is flowering in several places in the cemetery at the end of March. It is not witch hazel. It’s similar to those pictured on this page but has more pendulous bunches.
    Thanks

  2. Judy Marino says:

    Thank you for this informative and thoughtful update. As a birder I of course very much miss not walking Mt Auburn’s beautiful grounds in May, but I appreciate the difficult – and safe – decisions you have made. Perhaps the migrating birds can appreciate the extra peacefulness this year:-)

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