Plants

January

There is no better time to come and enjoy our impressive evergreens. Mount Auburn’s conifer collection is noted for its size and diversity. With more than 80 different taxa and more than 1,500 plants, it is comparable to the conifer collections at … Continue reading

February

Now is a great time for a second look at many of our deciduous trees and shrubs. Even without their more showy foliage and flowers, many of our plants have something to contribute to the winter landscape. From the the impressive size and shape of some trees … Continue reading

March

Early signs of spring appear throughout the landscape in March.  The cheerful yellow blossoms of witchhazel that appear early in the month and the beautiful carpets of scilla  that emerge by month’s end remind us that warmer days are soon on their way. … Continue reading

April

Mount Auburn is painted in shades of yellow, pink, white and lilac thanks to the daffodils, forsythia, magnolias, and redbuds now blooming.  For many, though, it is the April flowering of Mount Auburn’s 20+ varieites of ornamental cherries that truly signal spring’s arrival. … Continue reading

May

It is no wonder that Mount Auburn welcomes so many visitors each May.  Flowering dogwoods, crabapples, lilacs, and azaleas are just some of what is on display.  If you’ve never been to the Cemetery, now is the time to make … Continue reading

June

Though May might be the peak of spring bloom, there is still plenty of interest in June.  Rhododendrons, Mountain Laurel, and Kousa Dogwoods add plenty of late-spring color to the landscape. The annual and perennial plants planted in flower beds throughout … Continue reading

July

In July, make your way out to Willow Pond for a glimpse of our butterfly garden at its peak. As you walk at to the pond, you’ll notice a number of summer-blooming trees and shrubs adding seasonal interest to the … Continue reading

August

Late summer blooming ornamentals provide plenty of reasons to visit Mount Auburn, though perhaps the best reason to visit the Cemetery in August is to seek shade beheath the Cemetery’s dense canopy of shade trees.  Maples and oaks are among our shade … Continue reading

September

As the last of our summer-blooming plants make a showing in September, other plants begin showing the tell-tale signs of autumn’s approach.  Our wildflower meadow, located at  Washington Tower, is now at its peak as we bid farewell to one … Continue reading

October

By mid-October Mount Auburn’s landscape is awash in color.  As our many deciduous trees and shrubs begin to transform their foliage into jewel-tone shades of red, orange, yellow, and purple, other plants set out their fall fruits and nuts. Here are some … Continue reading

November

The diversity in Mount Auburn’s collection of trees ensures an prolonged foliage season each fall.  Even in November, there is still plenty of color in the landscape. From our noble oaks displaying autumn color to the fall-blooming witchhzel, there is plenty to see at the Cemetery.  Here are … Continue reading

December

As our deciduous plants drop their last leaves we welcome the winter season. Now is the time to explore Mount Auburn’s many plants displaying four season interest.  The diversity in our horticultural collections ensure that a visit to Mount Auburn at … Continue reading

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Winter Interest Trees & Shrubs at Mount Auburn

February 8, 2014

Mount Auburn Cemetery attracts over 200,000 visitors per year, and they visit for many different reasons. Families and friends come to pay tribute to loved ones every day, as we continue to do about 500 new burials per year. Others come to enjoy the beautiful landscape, the magnificent trees, the birds and other wildlife, or the amazing collection of funerary art and architecture. Many attend our educational programs and tours, and still others come to study history and learn about the notable residents of Mount Auburn. Some do all of the above. (more…)

Winter Interest Trees & Shrubs at Mount Auburn

February 8, 2014

Mount Auburn Cemetery attracts over 200,000 visitors per year, and they visit for many different reasons. Families and friends come to pay tribute to loved ones every day, as we continue to do about 500 new burials per year. Others come to enjoy the beautiful landscape, the magnificent trees, the birds and other wildlife, or the amazing collection of funerary art and architecture. Many attend our educational programs and tours, and still others come to study history and learn about the notable residents of Mount Auburn. Some do all of the above. (more…)

A Field Guide to Mount Auburn’s Interesting Conifers

February 1, 2013

Learn about Mount Auburn’s interesting conifers:

Abies concolor – White Fir, Abies homolepis – Nikko Fir, Abies nordmanniana -Nordman Fir, Cedrus atlantica – Blue Atlas Cedar, Cedrus libani – Cedar of Lebanon, Cryptomeria japonica – Cryptomeria, Picea abies – Norway Spruce, Picea engelmannii – Engelmann Spruce, Picea koyamai – Koyama Spruce, Picea omorika – Serbian Spruce, Picea orientalis – Oriental Spruce, Picea torana – Tiger-tail Spruce, Pinus aristata – Rocky Mountain Bristlecone Pine, Pinus bungeana – Lacebark Pine, Pinus densiflora – Japanese Red Pine, Pinus jeffreyi – Yellow Pine, Pinus koraiensis – Korean Pine, Pinus nigra – Austrian Pine, Pinus parviflora – Japanese White Pine, Pinus pungens – Table Mountain Pine, Pinus strobus – Eastern White Pine, Pinus wallichiana – Himalayan Pine, Pseudotsuga menziesii -Douglas Fir, Sciadopitys verticillata – Japanese Umbrella Pine, Tsuga Canadensis – Canadian Hemlock, Tsuga caroliniana – Carolina Hemlock and more.

Pick up a copy of Mount Auburn’s Interesting Conifers Brochure on the racks at the Cemetery on your next visit (this most recent version has been compiled by Katie Robinson, January 2013).

A Field Guide to Mount Auburn's Interesting Conifers

February 1, 2013

Learn about Mount Auburn’s interesting conifers:

Abies concolor – White Fir, Abies homolepis – Nikko Fir, Abies nordmanniana -Nordman Fir, Cedrus atlantica – Blue Atlas Cedar, Cedrus libani – Cedar of Lebanon, Cryptomeria japonica – Cryptomeria, Picea abies – Norway Spruce, Picea engelmannii – Engelmann Spruce, Picea koyamai – Koyama Spruce, Picea omorika – Serbian Spruce, Picea orientalis – Oriental Spruce, Picea torana – Tiger-tail Spruce, Pinus aristata – Rocky Mountain Bristlecone Pine, Pinus bungeana – Lacebark Pine, Pinus densiflora – Japanese Red Pine, Pinus jeffreyi – Yellow Pine, Pinus koraiensis – Korean Pine, Pinus nigra – Austrian Pine, Pinus parviflora – Japanese White Pine, Pinus pungens – Table Mountain Pine, Pinus strobus – Eastern White Pine, Pinus wallichiana – Himalayan Pine, Pseudotsuga menziesii -Douglas Fir, Sciadopitys verticillata – Japanese Umbrella Pine, Tsuga Canadensis – Canadian Hemlock, Tsuga caroliniana – Carolina Hemlock and more.

Pick up a copy of Mount Auburn’s Interesting Conifers Brochure on the racks at the Cemetery on your next visit (this most recent version has been compiled by Katie Robinson, January 2013).