Art

Annual Giving at Mount Auburn

November 29, 2016

The work we do here at Mount Auburn is incredibly diverse. As an active cemetery, historic landmark, accredited arboretum, and urban wildlife refuge, it takes all of our different departments working together to fulfill our mission to inspire, commemorate, and provide comfort in our beautiful landscape.

As we approach the end of the year, we are deeply grateful for the generous Annual Fund support we receive from our donors, which makes all of the work we do possible. Unrestricted gifts for our general operating budget have provided the resources required to do a variety of projects both to preserve this historic space and offer new ways of experiencing it, including the following highlights. (more…)

Nancy Rappaport and Regeneration

October 20, 2016

Each of us may find that we need to call on inner resources when we are challenged by our own vulnerability – with the impending fear of potential loss- we are  forced to define what we hold close and value.

Dr. Nancy Rappaport cultivated strength and joy as she reflected on her journey with breast cancer during performances of Regeneration, her one-woman play at Story Chapel earlier this year.

Diane Goshgarian’s interview with Nancy Rappaport and Meg Winslow, Mount Auburn’s Curator of Historical Collections from Behind the Pages: Special Edition (9/27/2016).

 


WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING ABOUT REGENERATION:

STAT (10/13/2016): Cemetery walks and playwriting: How I found healing after breast cancer

Princeton Alumni Weekly (9/28/2016): Nancy Rappaport ’82 Debuts ‘Regneration,’ a One-Woman Show About Surviving Cancer

Boston Magazine (9/19/2016): Local Psychiatrist Takes Her Battle with Cancer to the Stage

Cambridge Chronicle (9/20/2016): One-woman play at Cambridge cemetery chronicles doctor’s journey with breast cancer

Friends of Mount Auburn E-newsletter, (September 2016): Strength & Vulnerability: A Conversation with Dr. Nancy Rappaport


 

RegenerationRappaport_1

No stranger to the power of narrative, Rappaport is a child psychiatrist, author, and Harvard associate professor.

Researching Mount Auburn’s Thirty Most Significant Monuments

March 27, 2016

by Marilynne K. Roach, Historian

In 2015 I had the good fortune to join Mount Auburn Cemetery’s IMLS project to research and document thirty of their most significant monuments. My job was to conduct off-site research before the grant’s end of the year deadline.

Several of the thirty monuments were already well documented. For others, we needed to find more information about the monument’s symbolism and inspiration; the sculptors, architects, and carvers who made them; the person being commemorated, any association they or their families may have had with the makers and reasons for their choices; donors who may have commissioned the work and how it was financed; where it was constructed and how it was shipped to its final site; and if there was a dedication. (more…)

Friends Seeks Support to Conserve Three Monuments

March 24, 2016

After the successful conservation of the Binney Monument in 2014 and the Magoun Monument in 2015, the Friends of Mount Auburn is seeking funds to conserve the next three monuments in Mount Auburn’s Significant Monument Collection:

In 1868, German immigrant and successful businessman Arnold M. Coppenhagen and his wife, Mehitable Coppenhagen, tragically lost their thirty-year-old daughter Maria, for whom they had great affection. Mrs. Coppenhagen commissioned the up-and-coming Boston artist Martin Milmore, who was at the time working in Rome, to sculpt the moving monument to Maria. Milmore, who also carved the Mount Auburn Sphinx, was Boston’s leading sculptor in the mid-1800s and is known for his Soldiers and Sailors Monument in the Boston Common. The Maria Frances Coppenhagen Monument (Lot #3733 Sycamore Path)  features a full-sized, sculpted Angel of Resurrection holding a trumpet. It was lauded in the nineteenth century and is recognized today as one of Milmore’s finest works. However, the elegant statue is now dirty and covered with biological growth. The marble surface has cracked, and the long, elegant wings of the angel are in danger of breaking. (more…)