Art

Support Preservation of Significant Monuments: Samuel Appleton and Wigglesworth Cradle

March 1, 2018

Mount Auburn’s diverse collection of monuments and funerary art from the early nineteenth century through today, interwoven into the landscape, is the reason for so much of our aesthetic richness, educational value, and historical significance. By nature of being an outdoor collection, many of our monuments now require an extra level of care and maintenance to protect them after years of exposure to the elements. The Friends of Mount Auburn Cemetery has been working on a multi-year initiative to prioritize conservation of the most significant monuments on our grounds ever since 2014, and plans are now underway for the latest in this series for 2018. (more…)

Sweet Auburn Magazine

January 16, 2018

Published biannually, Sweet Auburn is an exploration and celebration of the many facets of Mount Auburn Cemetery. Topics covered in the magazine include art, architecture, biography, burial and commemoration, conservation, design, ecology, education, history, horticulture , genealogy, preservation, and wildlife. (more…)

Angels of Mount Auburn

December 27, 2017

Images of celestial beings are found throughout the Cemetery, proudly posing on pedestals or tucked into the decorations of many monuments.  The brochures below include some of the many angels and cherubs found at Mount Auburn.

Join Rosemarie Smurzynski for a tour of Angels & Cherubs at a future date to be announced!

A Guide to Angels in Mount Auburn Cemetery
and their Role in Consoling the Human Heart

The word angel derives from the Greek “angelos” which means messenger.

In Islam the word for angel is “mala” which also means messenger. (more…)

Maria Richards Oakey Dewing

October 1, 2017

American Painter Maria Richards Oakey was born on October 27, 1845 in New York City.  Although she originally grappled with the choice of pursuing writing or painting when she was a young adult, Maria eventually chose to study at the Cooper Union School of Design for Women in New York City where she learned to paint in oil and watercolor. After her time at the Cooper Union, she went on to study art for another four years at the National Academy of Design, also in New York City.  In 1875 Oakey joined fellow Academy students in establishing the Art Students League, which provided a cosmopolitan and progressive alternative to studying art compared to the traditionalism offered at the Academy. (more…)